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dc.contributor.authorAlexandrov, Sergey
dc.contributor.authorMcNamara, Paul M.
dc.contributor.authorDas, Nandan
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Yi
dc.contributor.authorLynch, Gillian
dc.contributor.authorHogan, Josh
dc.contributor.authorLeahy, Martin
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-24T10:09:08Z
dc.date.issued2019-09-16
dc.identifier.citationAlexandrov, Sergey, McNamara, Paul M., Das, Nandan, Zhou, Yi, Lynch, Gillian, Hogan, Josh, & Leahy, Martin. (2019). Spatial frequency domain correlation mapping optical coherence tomography for nanoscale structural characterization. Applied Physics Letters, 115(12), 121105. doi: 10.1063/1.5110459en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1077-3118
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/15457
dc.description.abstractMost of the fundamental pathological processes in living tissues exhibit changes at the nanoscale. Noninvasive, label-free detection of structural changes in biological samples pose a significant challenge to both researchers and healthcare professionals. It is highly desirable to be able to resolve these structural changes, during physiological processes, both spatially and temporally. Modern nanoscopy largely requires labeling, is limited to superficial 2D imaging, and is generally not suitable for in vivo applications. Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly evident that 2D biology often does not translate into the real 3D situation. Here, we present a method, spatial frequency domain correlation mapping optical coherence tomography (sf-cmOCT), for detection of depth resolved nanoscale structural changes noninvasively. Our approach is based on detection and correlation of the depth resolved spectra of axial spatial frequencies of the object which are extremely sensitive to structural alterations. The presented work describes the principles of this approach and demonstrates its feasibility by monitoring internal structural changes within objects, including human skin in vivo. Structural changes can be visualized at each point in the sample in space from a single image or over time using two or more images. These experimental results demonstrate possibilities for the study of nanoscale structural changes, without the need for biomarkers or labels. Thus, sf-cmOCT offers exciting and far-reaching opportunities for early disease diagnosis and treatment response monitoring, as well as a myriad of applications for researchers.en_IE
dc.description.sponsorshipThis project received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under Grant Agreement Nos. 761214 and 779960. The materials presented and views expressed here are the responsibility of the author(s) only. The EU Commission takes no responsibility for any use made of the information set out. Also, this work was supported by NUI Galway, Galway University Foundation, the University of Limerick Foundation, the National Biophotonics Imaging Platform (NBIP) Ireland funded under the Higher Education Authority PRTLI Cycle 4 and co-funded by the Irish Government and the European Union, Compact Imaging, Inc., and Nandan Das received Government of Ireland postdoctoral fellowship grant with project ID: GOIPD/2017/837. Sergey Alexandrov, Paul M. McNamara, Josh Hogan, and Martin Leahy have a financial interest in Compact Imaging, Inc. The authors have no other relevant financial interest in this article and no other potential conflicts of interest to disclose. The acquisition of the in-vivo samples does not affect any ethical, health, or privacy concerns and was performed according to the ethical regulations and safety standards of the NUI Galway.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherAIP Publishingen_IE
dc.relation.ispartofApplied Physics Lettersen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ie/
dc.subjectMedical imagingen_IE
dc.subjectComputer simulationen_IE
dc.subjectSpatial dimensionsen_IE
dc.subjectDepth profiling techniquesen_IE
dc.subjectTomographyen_IE
dc.subjectOptical imagingen_IE
dc.subjectAngiographyen_IE
dc.subjectFourier opticsen_IE
dc.subjectPhotonicsen_IE
dc.titleSpatial frequency domain correlation mapping optical coherence tomography for nanoscale structural characterizationen_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2019-09-23T16:19:50Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1063/1.5110459
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://doi.org/10.1063/1.5110459en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.contributor.funderHorizon 2020en_IE
dc.contributor.funderGalway University Foundationen_IE
dc.contributor.funderUniversity of Limerick Foundationen_IE
dc.contributor.funderIrish Research Councilen_IE
dc.internal.rssid17767879
dc.local.contactSergey Alexandrov, School Of Physics, Nui Galway. - Email: sergey.alexandrov@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedAPC paid for open access (email from author 25/09/2019)
dc.local.versionPUBLISHED
dcterms.projectinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020::RIA/761214/EU/NanoSTARS imaging for STEM cell therapy for arthritic joints/STARSTEMen_IE
dcterms.projectinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020::IA/779960/EU/IMaging-based CUSTOMised EYE diagnostics/IMCUSTOMEYEen_IE
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