Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorVelupillai, K. Velaen
dc.identifier.citationVelupillai, K. V., (2007) "Taming the Incomputable, Reconstructing the Nonconstructive and Deciding the Undecidable in Mathematical Economics" (Working Paper No. 0128) Department of Economics, National University of Ireland, Galway.en
dc.description.abstractIt is natural to claim, as I do in this paper, that the emergence of non-constructivities in economics is entirely due to the formalizations of economics by means of 'classical' mathematics. I have made similar claims for the emergence of uncomputabilities and undecidabilities in economics in earlier writings. Here, on the other hand, I want to suggest a way of confronting uncomputabilities, and remedying non-constructivities, in economics, and turning them into a positive force for modelling, for example, endogenous growth, as suggested by Stefano Zambelli. In between, a case is made for economics to take seriously the kind of mathematical modelling fostered by Feynman and Dirac, in particular the way they developed the path integral and the ?- function, respectively. A sketch of a 'research program' in mathematical economics, analogous to the way Gödel thought incompleteness and its perplexities should be interpreted and resolved, is also outlined in the concluding section.en
dc.publisherNational University of Ireland, Galwayen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesworking papers;0128en
dc.titleTaming the Incomputable, Reconstructing the Nonconstructive and Deciding the Undecidable in Mathematical Economicsen
dc.typeWorking Paperen

Files in this item

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland
This item is available under the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland. No item may be reproduced for commercial purposes. Please refer to the publisher's URL where this is made available, or to notes contained in the item itself. Other terms may apply.

The following license files are associated with this item:

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record