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dc.contributor.authorAgarwal, Anuj
dc.contributor.authorTaveneau, Adélaïde
dc.contributor.authorOlbert, Agnieszka Indiana
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-08T08:48:33Z
dc.date.available2021-01-08T08:48:33Z
dc.date.issued2018-08-29
dc.identifier.citationAgarwal, Anuj, Taveneau, Adélaïde, & Olbert, Agnieszka Indiana. (2018). Remote sensing of surface waters in Ireland. Paper presented at the CERI 2018, University College Dublin, Dublin, 29-30 August.en_IE
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/16430
dc.description.abstractAn implementation of the WFD requires all surface waters in the EU to achieve at least good status; this requirement has not been achieved in Ireland. Just over 30% of transitional waters and 79% of coastal waters were satisfactory at good or high status. Irish transitional and coastal (TraC) waters are threatened by the synergistic effects of multiple environmental pressures such as nutrient enrichment, oxygen depletion and acidification. The overarching aim of this research is to assess a potential use of chlorophyll-a Remotely Sensed (RS) products to inform and improve Irish TraC water monitoring programme under WFD. In this research, the accuracy of level-3 and -4 processed chlorophyll-a concentrations derived from satellite observations of water colour has been analysed for Irish TraC waters. In total four datasets derived from four missions and for four retrieval algorithms have been inter-compared and validated against in-situ data on various temporal and spatial scales. The research shows that temporal and spatial coverage of RS data is very good in overall and VIIRS provides the most accurate set of chlorophyll-a concentrations in Irish TraC waters. The chlorophyll-a data derived from remote sensing observations have a potential to complement the TraC water monitoring and improve the current programme. The outcomes of this research are immensely important for surface water monitoring programme and water quality, and as such to policy makers, waters management bodies, scientists and local communities.en_IE
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Authors would like to thank EPA and Marine Institute for chlorophyll-a in-situ data, and Copernicus CMEMS services for making RS products available.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherCivil Engineering Research Association of Ireland (CERAI)en_IE
dc.relation.ispartofCERI 2018en
dc.subjectChlorophyll-aen_IE
dc.subjectEutrophicationen_IE
dc.subjectWater Qualityen_IE
dc.subjectIrish Transitional and Coastal Watersen_IE
dc.subjectRemote Sensingen_IE
dc.subjectWater Framework Directiveen_IE
dc.subjectCMEMS programmeen_IE
dc.subjectCopernicus Servicesen_IE
dc.titleRemote sensing of surface waters in Irelanden_IE
dc.typeConference Paperen_IE
dc.date.updated2021-01-06T12:21:47Z
dc.local.publishedsourcehttp://www.cerai.net/page/15/past-conferences/index.htmlen_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewednon-peer-reviewed
dc.internal.rssid24247518
dc.local.contactAgnieszka Olbert, Civil Engineering, Neb Room 2030, Nui Galway. 3208 Email: indiana.olbert@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes
dc.local.versionSUBMITTED
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