Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKelly, Colette
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-22T13:33:51Z
dc.date.available2012-06-22T13:33:51Z
dc.date.issued2009-07-01
dc.identifier.citationHaug, E., Rasmussen, M., Samdal, O., Iannotti, R., Kelly, C., Borraccino, A., Vereecken, C., Melkevik, O., Lazzeri, G., Giacchi, M., Ercan, O., Due, P., Ravens-Sieberer, U., Currie, C., Morgan, A., Ahluwalia, N. & the HBSC Obesity Writing Group 2009. Overweight in school-aged children and its relationship with demographic and lifestyle factors: results from the WHO-Collaborative Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) Study. International Journal of Public Health, 54, s167-179.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1661-8564
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/2868
dc.description.abstractObjectives - To examine overweight prevalence and its association with demographic and lifestyle factors in 11-15 year olds in the HBSC 2005-2006 survey. Methods - Self-reports of height, weight, eating patterns, physical activity and sedentary behaviours were obtained from nationally representative samples in 41 countries (n=205,939). Results - Overweight prevalence was highest in USA (28.8%) and lowest in Latvia (7.6%). In most countries, overweight was more prevalent in boys than girls. Overweight was consistently negatively associated with breakfast consumption and moderate to vigorous physical activity; OR range: 0.48-0.79 and 0.50-0.78, respectively. Conclusion Overweight prevalence in youth remained high across the countries examined. The primary factors linked to overweight were breakfast consumption and physical activity. These data should contribute to formulating preventive programs and policies.en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBirkhäuser Verlagen_US
dc.subjectSchool childrenen_US
dc.subjectOverweight prevalenceen_US
dc.subjectEatting patternsen_US
dc.subjectPhysical activityen_US
dc.subjectSedentary behavioursen_US
dc.subjectHealth Promotionen_US
dc.titleOverweight in school-aged children and its relationship with demographic and lifestyle factors: results from the WHO-Collaborative Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) Study.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00038-009-5408-6
dc.local.publishedsourcehttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00038-009-5408-6en_US
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-revieweden_US
dc.contributor.funderDepartment of Health and Childrenen_US
nui.item.downloads249


Files in this item

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland
This item is available under the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland. No item may be reproduced for commercial purposes. Please refer to the publisher's URL where this is made available, or to notes contained in the item itself. Other terms may apply.

The following license files are associated with this item:

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record