Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGrimes, Seamus
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-28T10:37:34Z
dc.date.available2012-02-28T10:37:34Z
dc.date.issued2004-06
dc.identifier.citationGrimes, S., Roper, S. (2005) 'Wireless Valley, Silicon Wadi and Digital Island - Helsinki, Tel Aviv and Dublin and the new economy GPN'. Geoforum, 36 :297-313.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0016-7185
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/2588
dc.description.abstractHyper-capitalism in global information and communication technology (ICT) markets during the late 1990s created a new global production network, shaped by multinational corporations, international capital flows, and a flourishing of high-tech entrepreneurship. Each of the cities considered here benefited substantially from this growth, but their positions as nodes in the ICT global production network differed markedly, as did their ability to appropriate the Value they generated. In Dublin, value creation was based largely on inward technology and capital flows, although indigenous Dublin-based software companies did demonstrate their ability to compete internationally. ICT development in Helsinki and Tel Aviv drew more strongly on the local knowledge base, and benefited from changes in national regulatory and political conditions. In Helsinki, public and private R&D investments supported the highly effective globalisation strategy of Nokia to create a strongly localised, vertically-integrated and strongly specialised sector. Value creation in the more diverse Israeli ICT sector was also based primarily on locally developed technology, university R&D and the commercialisation of technology developed initially for military applications. By the end of the 1990s, the resulting ICT node in Tel Aviv was grounded in the local knowledge-base, technologically diverse, strongly entrepreneurial and globally oriented. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofGeoforumen
dc.subjectGlobal production networken_US
dc.subjectICTen_US
dc.subjectGlobalisationen_US
dc.subjectIrelanden_US
dc.subjectIsraelen_US
dc.subjectFinlanden_US
dc.subjectHigh technologyen_US
dc.subjectEconomic developmenten_US
dc.subjectInnovationen_US
dc.subjectEnterprisesen_US
dc.subjectCapabilityen_US
dc.subjectIndustryen_US
dc.subjectEuropeen_US
dc.titleWireless Valley, Silicon Wadi and Digital Island - Helsinki, Tel Aviv and Dublin and the new economy GPNen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.date.updated2012-02-14T14:35:47Z
dc.local.publishedsourcehttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2004.07.003en_US
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.contributor.funder|~|
dc.internal.rssid1153008
dc.local.contactSéamus Grimes, Dept. Of Geography & Cisc, & Cedres, Room 110, Arts/Science Building, Nui Galway. 2636 Email: seamus.grimes@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedNo
dc.local.versionPUBLISHED
nui.item.downloads656


Files in this item

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland
This item is available under the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland. No item may be reproduced for commercial purposes. Please refer to the publisher's URL where this is made available, or to notes contained in the item itself. Other terms may apply.

The following license files are associated with this item:

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record