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dc.contributor.authorOrren, Ann
dc.contributor.authorO'Hara, Ann M.
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, B. Paul
dc.contributor.authorMoran, Anthony P.
dc.contributor.authorWurzner, Reinhard
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-24T08:26:08Z
dc.date.available2018-08-24T08:26:08Z
dc.date.issued2003-03-01
dc.identifier.citationOrren, Ann; O'Hara, Ann M. Morgan, B. Paul; Moran, Anthony P.; Wurzner, Reinhard (2003). An abnormal but functionally active complement component c9 protein found in an irish family with subtotal c9 deficiency. Immunology 108 (3), 384-390
dc.identifier.issn0019-2805,1365-2567
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/9754
dc.description.abstractTwo independently segregating C9 genetic defects have previously been reported in two siblings in an Irish family with subtotal C9 deficiency. One defect would lead to an abnormal C9 protein, with replacement of a cysteine by a glycine (C98G). The second defect is a premature stop codon at amino acid 406 which would lead to a truncated C9. However, at least one of two abnormal proteins was present in the circulation of the proband at 0.2% of normal C9 concentration. In this study, the abnormal protein was shown to have a molecular weight approximately equal to that of normal C9, and to carry the binding site for monoclonal antibody (mAb) Mc42 which is known to react with an epitope at amino acid positions 412-426, distal to 406. Therefore, the subtotal C9 protein carries the C98G defect. The protein was incorporated into the terminal complement complex, and was active in haemolytic, bactericidal and lipopolysaccharide release assays. A quantitative haemolytic assay indicated even slightly greater haemolytic efficiency than normal C9. Epitope mapping with six antihuman C9 mAbs showed the abnormal protein to react to these antibodies in the same way as normal C9. However, none of these mAbs have epitopes within the lipoprotein receptor A module, where the C98G defect is located. The role of this region in C9 functionality is still unclear. In conclusion, we have shown that the lack of a cysteine led to the production of a protein present in the circulation at very much reduced levels, but which was fully functionally active.
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell
dc.relation.ispartofImmunology
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ie/
dc.subjectmembrane attack complex
dc.subjectcysteine-rich repeat
dc.subjectescherichia-coli j5
dc.subject9th component
dc.subjectmonoclonal-antibodies
dc.subjectpolyacrylamide gels
dc.subjectpolymerization
dc.subjectidentification
dc.subjectlipopolysaccharide
dc.subjectinhibition
dc.titleAn abnormal but functionally active complement component c9 protein found in an irish family with subtotal c9 deficiency
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1365-2567.2003.01587.x
dc.local.publishedsourcehttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1365-2567.2003.01587.x/pdf
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