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dc.contributor.authorLeader, Geraldine
dc.contributor.authorGrennan, Susan
dc.contributor.authorChen, June L.
dc.contributor.authorMannion, Arlene
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-31T10:13:30Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-03
dc.identifier.citationLeader, Geraldine, Grennan, Susan, Chen, June L., & Mannion, Arlene. (2018). An Investigation of Gelotophobia in Individuals with a Diagnosis of High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. doi: 10.1007/s10803-018-3661-3en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1573-3432
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/7443
dc.description.abstractSamson et al. (Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 41:475 483, 2011) conducted the first empirical investigation examining the fear of being laughed at (gelotophobia) and its prevalence in individuals with high functioning autism spectrum disorder (hfASD). The present research examined gelotophobia in relation to social functioning, perceived social support, life satisfaction and quality of life (QoL) in individuals with hfASD, including past experiences of bullying and the presence of comorbid psychopathology. Participants were 103 adults with a clinical diagnosis of hfASD and 137 typically developing controls. Individuals with hfASD presented with higher rates of gelotophobia symptomatology in comparison to controls (87.4 vs. 22.6% respectively). It was also found that social functioning, past experiences of bullying, anxiety and life satisfaction were predictors of gelotophobia amongst individuals with hfASD.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagen_IE
dc.relation.ispartofJournal Of Autism And Developmental Disordersen
dc.subjectGelotophobiaen_IE
dc.subjectHigh-functioning autism spectrum disorderen_IE
dc.subjectFear of being laughed aten_IE
dc.subjectTeasing. Laughteren_IE
dc.subjectTeasingen_IE
dc.subjectLaughteren_IE
dc.titleAn investigation of gelotophobia in individuals with a diagnosis of high-functioning autism spectrum disorderen_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2018-07-05T13:53:53Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10803-018-3661-3
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-018-3661-3en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.description.embargo2019-07-03
dc.internal.rssid14588034
dc.local.contactArlene Mannion, Irish Centre For Autism, & Neurodevelopment Research, School Of Psychology, Nui Galway. Email: arlene.mannion@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
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