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dc.contributor.advisorHogan, Michael
dc.contributor.authorHarney, Owen
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T08:40:04Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-24
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/7430
dc.description.abstractResolving complex scientific and social problems requires effective collaboration. In the absence of adequate facilitation and the use of a structured methodology, however, collaborative groups often fail to reach their potential. Recognising this, John Warfield developed Interactive Management (IM), a computer-supported systems science methodology designed to harness the collective intelligence of groups, specifically, in the design of collaborative systems models. Warfield also proposed the incorporation of this methodology into a systems science education curriculum to foster skill in the application of collaborative, systems science methodologies. This thesis advanced upon Warfield’s vision by investigating key aspects of the integration of IM into university education. Over the course of three experimental studies, the IM facilitation process and collaborative learning process was modified in specific ways and effects on both learning and social-emotional outcomes and processes were examined. The findings of these studies were then used to inform the design and implementation of an applied systems science education curriculum, which was piloted with a group of 23 undergraduate students over the course of a semester. Study 1 investigated the influence of dialogue on students’ levels of perceived efficacy of the IM methodology, as well as levels of perceived consensus and objective consensus in relation to the topic which was the focus of the IM session. Study 1 revealed that restricting dialogue had a significant negative impact on students’ perceptions of the IM process. More specifically, students who were not permitted to engage in dialogue reported significantly lower levels of perceived efficacy of the IM methodology, as well as significantly lower levels of perceived consensus with other students in their group. Study 2 examined the effects of task-level versus process-level prompts on variety and complexity of argumentation during an IM systems model-building task, as well as students’ levels of perceived efficacy of the IM methodology, perceived consensus, objective consensus, and team orientation. When compared with task-level prompting, process-level prompting resulted in students engaging in more varied and complex argumentation during the collaborative systems model-building task, as well as reporting higher levels of perceived consensus and higher levels of perceived efficacy of the IM methodology. Study 3 investigated the effects of facilitator-driven prompting versus peer-to-peer prompting on the variety and complexity of argumentation during an IM systems model-building task, as well as students’ levels of perceived efficacy of the IM methodology, perceived consensus, objective consensus, team orientation, and discomfort in group learning. The results of this study revealed that peer-to-peer prompting had significant positive effects, resulting in more varied and complex argumentation during the collaborative systems model-building task, as well as significantly higher levels of perceived efficacy of the IM methodology, higher perceived consensus and team orientation, and significantly lower levels of discomfort in group learning. The findings of these studies were then used to inform the design and implementation of an applied systems science education curriculum, which was piloted with a group of undergraduate students over the course of a semester, and evaluated based on reflections provided by the students and instructors. These reflections, addressing various aspects of the pilot module design and delivery, were predominantly positive, indicating the potential of applied systems science education at university level going forward. The findings presented in this thesis, including their implications for teaching and learning, and contributions to the literature are discussed as well as considerations for the continued advancement of Warfield’s vision for applied systems science education. Finally, limitations of the studies and proposed directions for future research are outlined.en_IE
dc.publisherNUI Galway
dc.subjectCollaborative learningen_IE
dc.subjectLearning sciencesen_IE
dc.subjectComputer-supported collaborative learningen_IE
dc.subjectFacilitationen_IE
dc.subjectPromptingen_IE
dc.subjectPsychologyen_IE
dc.titleThe role of facilitation and social processes in collaborative learning: Implications for the design of an applied systems science curriculumen_IE
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.funderDoctoral Research Scholarship, National University of Ireland, Galwayen_IE
dc.local.noteThis thesis describes the application of a systems science methodology, Interactive Management (IM), in an educational context. Three experimental studies investigate facilitation and social processes during collaborative systems model-building tasks using IM. Findings from these experimental studies subsequently inform the design and implementation of a pilot applied systems science curriculum.en_IE
dc.description.embargo2019-07-24
dc.local.finalYesen_IE
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