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dc.contributor.advisorCarey, Daniel
dc.contributor.advisorConnolly, Maeve
dc.contributor.advisorStoneman, Rod
dc.contributor.authorHanes, Levi
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-22T14:20:01Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/7156
dc.description.abstractThis thesis considers a comedic trend in contemporary art that engages in a process of critical enquiry towards its own material structure and contextual frameworks. Certain contemporary artists employ a form of critical enquiry that is informed by, and structured through, a slapstick technique based on what recent comedy theorists such as John Morreall, Noël Carroll, and Mike W. Martin term Incongruity Theory. This theory suggests, as a basis for humour, that the viewer has an ironic distance from the object of consideration and an awareness of its context, an awareness of the incongruous act within a normative event. Artworks that feature the humorous, material disruption of slapstick express the content through a series of expositions and disruptions deployed by the artist and documented in the artwork. I propose that, in order for humorous artwork to launch a critical inquiry, it must make apparent to the viewer the physical and contextual material construction of the artwork. Slapstick, I will argue, is a route towards this reflexive material criticality. Drawing on theories concerning art as a method of mimicking the sublime derived from Theodor W. Adorno and Jean-François Lyotard’s considerations of Immanuel Kant’s aesthetics, I suggest that critically engaged slapstick artwork does not resolve in a distinct meaning or content or declarative statement other than a consideration of the process of making and the reception of the object by the viewer. This lack of deterministic resolution distinguishes artworks that engage in similar media to mass entertainment such as moving image and still photography. Rather than a resolution predicated by mass entertainment, the artwork remains reflexively open-ended, suggesting humorous outcomes, while not depending on them.en_IE
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ie/
dc.subjectAdornoen_IE
dc.subjectAestheticsen_IE
dc.subjectArten_IE
dc.subjectAvant-gardeen_IE
dc.subjectBenjaminen_IE
dc.subjectBergsonen_IE
dc.subjectComedyen_IE
dc.subjectComedy theoryen_IE
dc.subjectContemporary arten_IE
dc.subjectCritical aestheticsen_IE
dc.subjectFilmen_IE
dc.subjectHumouren_IE
dc.subjectIncongruity Theoryen_IE
dc.subjectIronyen_IE
dc.subjectKanten_IE
dc.subjectMimesisen_IE
dc.subjectModernismen_IE
dc.subjectParodyen_IE
dc.subjectPhotographyen_IE
dc.subjectPostmodernismen_IE
dc.subjectSculptureen_IE
dc.subjectSlapsticken_IE
dc.subjectSublimeen_IE
dc.subjectDigital videoen_IE
dc.subjectFilm and digital mediaen_IE
dc.subjectHumanitiesen_IE
dc.titleSuspended pratfalls: Slapstick in contemporary arten_IE
dc.typeThesisen_IE
dc.contributor.funderIrish Research Councilen_IE
dc.local.noteThe thesis draws on critical aesthetic, comedy and film theory to analyse slapstick in contemporary art that engages in a process of critical enquiry towards its own material structure and contextual frameworks. This theory posits that the viewer has an ironic distance from, yet empathetic response to, the art.en_IE
dc.description.embargo2022-02-21
dc.local.finalYesen_IE
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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland