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dc.contributor.authorMorrissey, John
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-04T13:18:15Z
dc.date.available2017-10-04T13:18:15Z
dc.date.issued2014-11-26
dc.identifier.citationMorrissey, John. (2016). US Central Command and liberal imperial reach: ‘Shaping the Central Region for the 21st Century’. The Geographical Journal, 182(1), 15-26. doi: 10.1111/geoj.12118en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1475-4959
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/6854
dc.description.abstractFor over 30 years, the grand strategy of one of the most important commands in the US military, Central Command (CENTCOM), has consistently held fast to a commitment to neoliberal capitalism and an ostensibly free-market global economy. Any accrued national or global economic benefits are impossible to chart, of course, and so CENTCOM's securitization discourse relies upon vaguer, yet promissory logics about keeping the global economy open'. My aim in this paper is to show how the story of CENTCOM's mission is crucial to understanding how US military interventionism works today through a discursive geoeconomic imagination that is vague yet persuasive in its universalist dimensions. In a period marked by globalisation and new forms of capitalist accumulation, CENTCOM's mission has nevertheless habitually involved fashioning itself in a neoliberal world policeman' role, and to that end has employed a strategy that can be best described as one of geoeconomic deterrence'. The paper outlines the entwined military and economic security logics of this strategy, which have resulted in the Middle East and Central Asia being repeatedly conditioned as requiring forms of corrective military interventionism. Since its establishment in 1983, CENTCOM's strategy papers, mission statements and annual reports to Congress have collectively scripted practices of intervention and deterrence that rely upon dominant registers of military and economic risk. In critically considering CENTCOM's mission, the paper shows how the command's initiation fundamentally changed US foreign policy by solidifying the Carter Doctrine and subsequently committing to the geoeconomic shaping of the most energy-rich region on earth.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherWileyen_IE
dc.relation.ispartofGeographical Journalen
dc.subjectUnited States Central Commanden_IE
dc.subjectGeoeconomic deterrenceen_IE
dc.subjectSecuritizationen_IE
dc.subjectCritical geopoliticsen_IE
dc.subjectWaren_IE
dc.subjectBiopoliticsen_IE
dc.subjectSecurityen_IE
dc.subjectTerroren_IE
dc.subjectGeographyen_IE
dc.titleUS Central Command and liberal imperial reach: 'Shaping the Central Region for the 21st Century'en_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2017-10-03T09:49:52Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/geoj.12118
dc.local.publishedsourcehttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/geoj.12118en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.contributor.funder|~|6201984|~|
dc.internal.rssid10769123
dc.local.contactJohn Morrissey, Room 111 Geography, National University Of Ireland, , University Road, Galway. 2267 Email: john.morrissey@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedNo
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
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