Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMorrissey, John
dc.contributor.authorClavin, Alma
dc.contributor.authorReilly, Kathy
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-04T13:02:31Z
dc.date.available2017-10-04T13:02:31Z
dc.date.issued2013-05-14
dc.identifier.citationMorrissey, John, Clavin, Alma, & Reilly, Kathy. (2013). Field-based learning: the challenge of practising participatory knowledge. Journal of Geography in Higher Education, 37(4), 619-627. doi: 10.1080/03098265.2013.794333en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1466-1845
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/6853
dc.description.abstractIn 2009, Geography at National University of Ireland, Galway, launched a new taught master's programme, the MA in Environment, Society and Development. The vision for the programme was to engage students in the analysis and critique of the array of interventionary practices of development and securitization in our contemporary world. A range of modules were set up focusing on a number of interrelated concerns, including “geopolitics and security”, “environment and risk” and “managing development”. These core themes are approached from a number of critical perspectives, including political ecology, critical geopolitics and political economy. A key additional aim from the outset was to go beyond solely academic critique to consider participatory forms of development knowledge and practice that can emerge from “field-based learning”. To this end, a module entitled “field-based learning” was initiated, involving a 12-week seminar course in Galway, followed by a week-long fieldwork programme in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, where each year approximately 15 students intersect with the development work of local community leaders, the UN, EU and a variety of NGOs, civil society organizations and public advocacy groups. In this paper, we outline some of the key challenges of initiating and practising such a grounded and often unsystematic approach to learning in the field. We reflect, in particular, on the complexities involved in seeking to facilitate and practise critical participatory knowledges that comprise both academic and civic engagement values.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_IE
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Geography in Higher Educationen
dc.subjectField-based learning (FBL)en_IE
dc.subjectGeographyen_IE
dc.subjectTaught mastersen_IE
dc.subjectParticipatory knowledgeen_IE
dc.subjectCivic engagementen_IE
dc.subjectStudentsen_IE
dc.subjectCoursesen_IE
dc.subjectExperienceen_IE
dc.subjectBosnia-Herzegovinaen_IE
dc.titleField-based learning: the challenge of practising participatory knowledgeen_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2017-10-03T09:56:28Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03098265.2013.794333
dc.local.publishedsourcehttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03098265.2013.794333en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.contributor.funder|~|1267880|~|
dc.internal.rssid5733756
dc.local.contactJohn Morrissey, Room 111 Geography, National University Of Ireland, , University Road, Galway. 2267 Email: john.morrissey@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedNo
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
nui.item.downloads101


Files in this item

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland
This item is available under the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland. No item may be reproduced for commercial purposes. Please refer to the publisher's URL where this is made available, or to notes contained in the item itself. Other terms may apply.

The following license files are associated with this item:

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record