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dc.contributor.authorLi, Yang
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Chong-Wen
dc.contributor.authorSomers, Kieran P.
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Kuiwen
dc.contributor.authorCurran, Henry J.
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-04T14:26:02Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-16
dc.identifier.citationLi, Yang, Zhou, Chong-Wen, Somers, Kieran P., Zhang, Kuiwen, & Curran, Henry J. (2017). The oxidation of 2-butene: A high pressure ignition delay, kinetic modeling study and reactivity comparison with isobutene and 1-butene. Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, 36(1), 403-411. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.proci.2016.05.052en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1540-7489
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/6650
dc.description.abstractButenes are intermediates ubiquitously formed by decomposition and oxidation of larger hydrocarbons (e.g. alkanes) or alcohols present in conventional or reformulated fuels. In this study, a series of novel igni-tion delay time (IDT) experiments of trans-2-butene were performed in a high-pressure shock tube (HPST) and in a rapid compression machine (RCM) under conditions of relevance to practical combustors. This is the first IDT data of trans-2-butene taken at engine relevant conditions, and the combination of HPST and RCM results greatly expands the range of data available for the oxidation of trans-2-butene to higher pressures (10-50 atm), lower temperatures (670-1350 K) and a wide range of equivalence ratios (0.5-2.0). A comprehensive chemical kinetic mechanism has simultaneously been developed to describe the combustion of trans-2-butene. It has been validated using the IDT data measured here in addition to a large variety of literature data: jet-stirred reactor (JSR) speciation data, premixed flame speciation data, flow reactor speci-ation data and laminar flame speed data. Moreover, the reactivity of trans-2-butene is compared to that of the other two isomers, 1-butene and isobutene, and these comparisons are discussed. Important reactions are highlighted via flux and sensitivity analyses and help explain the differences in reactivity among the butene isomers. (C) 2016 by The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc.en_IE
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors thank the entire group members at Combustion Chemistry Centre for helpful discussions. This work at NUI Galway was supported by Saudi Aramco under the FUELCOM program.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherElsevieren_IE
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings Of The Combustion Instituteen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ie/
dc.subjectTrans-2-buteneen_IE
dc.subjectShock tubeen_IE
dc.subjectRapid compression machineen_IE
dc.subjectChemical kineticsen_IE
dc.subjectIgnition delay timeen_IE
dc.subjectEthylene air mixturesen_IE
dc.subjectElevated pressuresen_IE
dc.subjectButene isomersen_IE
dc.subjectShock tubeen_IE
dc.subjectPyrolysisen_IE
dc.subjectHydrocarbonen_IE
dc.subjectMoleculesen_IE
dc.titleThe oxidation of 2-butene: A high pressure ignition delay, kinetic modeling study and reactivity comparison with isobutene and 1-buteneen_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2017-07-03T16:13:45Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.proci.2016.05.052
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.proci.2016.05.052en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.contributor.funder|~|
dc.description.embargo2018-06-16
dc.internal.rssid12329150
dc.local.contactHenry Curran, Dept Of Chemistry, Room 215, Arts/Science Building, Nui Galway. 3856 Email: henry.curran@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedNo
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
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