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dc.contributor.authorSesker, Amanda A.
dc.contributor.authorÓ Súilleabháin, Páraic
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Siobhán
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Brian M.
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-27T10:46:13Z
dc.date.available2017-03-27T10:46:13Z
dc.date.issued2016-02-03
dc.identifier.citationSesker, A. A., Súilleabháin, P. Ó., Howard, S., and Hughes, B. M. (2016) Conscientiousness and mindfulness in midlife coping: An assessment based on MIDUS II. Personality and Mental Health, 10: 29–42. doi: 10.1002/pmh.1323en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1932-863X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/6409
dc.description.abstractResearch has demonstrated that conscientious individuals tend to engage in planful problem solving to cope with stressful situations. Likewise, mindful individuals tend to favour approach-based coping and are less likely to engage in avoidant coping strategies. To examine whether conscientiousness and mindfulness determined agentic coping behaviour, hierarchical linear regressions were conducted using data from 602 participants drawn from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS) Study II and MIDUS II Biomarker Project. Personality responses were derived from the five-factor model inventory, gathered at a single time-point. Results revealed that conscientiousness predicted problem-focused coping (p < 0.001; β = 0.23) and inversely predicted emotion-focused coping respectively (p < 0.001; β = −0.14), even after controlling for remaining Big Five and confounding variables. Mindfulness also predicted problem-focused coping (p < 0.001; β = 0.21). Neuroticism predicted emotion-focused coping (p < 0.001; β = 0.40). These findings suggest that conscientiousness and mindfulness may contribute to coping responses in potentially healthful ways, highlighting new evidence regarding the potential protective role of conscientiousness.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherWileyen_IE
dc.relation.ispartofPersonality And Mental Healthen
dc.subjectPsychologyen_IE
dc.subjectConscientiousnessen_IE
dc.subjectMindfulnessen_IE
dc.subjectMidlife copingen_IE
dc.subjectMIDUS IIen_IE
dc.titleConscientiousness and mindfulness in midlife coping: An assessment based on MIDUS IIen_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2017-03-27T10:35:25Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pmh.1323
dc.local.publishedsourcehttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pmh.1323en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.contributor.funder|~|
dc.internal.rssid9866328
dc.local.contactBrian Michael Hughes, School Of Psychology, Room 1022, Arts Millennium Building, Nui Galway. 3568 Email: brian.hughes@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedNo
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
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