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dc.contributor.authorVega, Amaya
dc.contributor.authorKilgarriff, Paul
dc.contributor.authorO'Donoghue, Cathal
dc.contributor.authorMorrissey, Karyn
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-17T14:57:11Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-24
dc.identifier.citationVega, A., Kilgarriff, P., O’Donoghue, C., Morrissey, K. (2016) 'The Spatial Impact of Commuting on Income: a Spatial Microsimulation Approach'. Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy, doi:10.1007/s12061-016-9202-6en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1874-4621
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/6068
dc.description.abstractThe Irish economic boom resulted in a substantial increase in car-ownership and commuting. These trends were particularly noticeable in the Greater Dublin Area (GDA), with an unprecedented increase in employment levels and private car registrations. While employment dropped by an overall 6 % during the recent economic recession, the already increasing process of suburbanisation around Irish main cities continued. The commuting belt around Dublin extended beyond the GDA with a substantial number of individuals commuting long distances. The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of both monetary and non-monetary commuting costs on the distribution of employment income in Ireland. The Census of Population is the only nationwide source of information on commuting patterns in Ireland. However, this data set does not include information on individual income. In contrast, SMILE (Simulation Model for the Irish Local Economy) contains employment income data for each individual in Ireland. Using data from the Census of Population of Ireland, discrete choice models of commuting mode choice are estimated for three sub-samples of the Irish population based on residential and employment location and the subjective value of travel time (SVTT) is calculated. The SVTT is then combined with the SMILE data to produce a geo-referenced, attribute rich dataset containing commuting, income, demographic and socio-economic data. Results show that the monetary and non-monetary costs of commuting are highest among those living and working in the GDA.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagen_IE
dc.relation.ispartofApplied Spatial Analysis and Policyen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ie/
dc.subjectEconomicsen_IE
dc.subjectSpatial mircosimulationen_IE
dc.subjectEmploymenten_IE
dc.subjectIncomeen_IE
dc.subjectCommutingen_IE
dc.subjectTravel to work modelsen_IE
dc.titleThe spatial impact of commuting on income: a spatial microsimulation approachen_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2016-10-13T10:14:36Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12061-016-9202-6
dc.local.publishedsourcehttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12061-016-9202-6en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.contributor.funder|~|
dc.description.embargo2017-08-24
dc.internal.rssid11398304
dc.local.contactAmaya Vega, J.E. Cairnes School Of, Business & Economics, Room 340, Nui Galway. 5679 Email: amaya.vega@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedNo
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland