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dc.contributor.authorKelly, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Noel M.
dc.contributor.authorMcDonnell, Pat F.
dc.contributor.authorMcGarry, J. Patrick
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-23T15:59:50Z
dc.date.available2014-09-22T15:11:36Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationKelly, N,Harrison, NM,McDonnell, P,McGarry, JP (2013) 'An experimental and computational investigation of the post-yield behaviour of trabecular bone during vertebral device subsidence'. Biomechanics And Modeling In Mechanobiology, 12 :685-703.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/4021
dc.description.abstractInterbody fusion device subsidence has been reported clinically. An enhanced understanding of the mechanical behaviour of the surrounding bone would allow for accurate predictions of vertebral subsidence. The multiaxial inelastic behaviour of trabecular bone is investigated at a microscale and macroscale level. The post-yield behaviour of trabecular bone under hydrostatic and confined compression is investigated using microcomputed tomography-derived microstructural models, elucidating a mechanism of pressure-dependent yielding at the macroscopic level. Specifically, microstructural trabecular simulations predict a distinctive yield point in the apparent stress-strain curve under uniaxial, confined and hydrostatic compression. Such distinctive apparent stress-strain behaviour results from localised stress concentrations and material yielding in the trabecular microstructure. This phenomenon is shown to be independent of the plasticity formulation employed at a trabecular level. The distinctive response can be accurately captured by a continuum model using a crushable foam plasticity formulation in which pressure-dependent yielding occurs. Vertebral device subsidence experiments are also performed, providing measurements of the trabecular plastic zone. It is demonstrated that a pressure-dependent plasticity formulation must be used for continuum level macroscale models of trabecular bone in order to replicate the experimental observations, further supporting the microscale investigations. Using a crushable foam plasticity formulation in the simulation of vertebral subsidence, it is shown that the predicted subsidence force and plastic zone size correspond closely with the experimental measurements. In contrast, the use of von Mises, Drucker-Prager and Hill plasticity formulations for continuum trabecular bone models lead to over prediction of the subsidence force and plastic zone.en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlagen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBiomechanics And Modeling In Mechanobiologyen
dc.subjectTrabecular boneen_US
dc.subjectPressure-dependent yieldingen_US
dc.subjectHydrostatic compressionen_US
dc.subjectConfined compressionen_US
dc.subjectmicroCT finite element analysisen_US
dc.subjectVertebral subsidenceen_US
dc.subjectCrushable foamen_US
dc.subjectFinite-element modelsen_US
dc.subjectHigh-speed photographyen_US
dc.subjectFemoral fracture loaden_US
dc.subjectEnd-plateen_US
dc.subjectMechanical propertiesen_US
dc.subjectCancellous boneen_US
dc.subjectCompressive behavioren_US
dc.subjectCortical boneen_US
dc.subjectLumbar spineen_US
dc.subjectStrengthen_US
dc.titleAn experimental and computational investigation of the post-yield behaviour of trabecular bone during vertebral device subsidenceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.date.updated2013-09-18T14:11:09Z
dc.identifier.doiDOI 10.1007/s10237-012-0434-3
dc.local.publishedsourcehttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10237-012-0434-3en_US
dc.local.publisherstatementThe final publication is available at link.springer.comen_US
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.contributor.funder|~|
dc.internal.rssid4881245
dc.local.contactNicola Kelly, Biomedical Engineering, College Of Engineering, & Informatics, Nui Galway. Email: nicola.kelly@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedNo I think there is a year ban on this.
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
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