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dc.contributor.authorReddy, Kiran
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Dara
dc.contributor.authorBreen, Dorothy
dc.contributor.authorLydon, Sinéad
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-20T09:30:48Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-10
dc.identifier.citationReddy, Kiran, Byrne, Dara, Breen, Dorothy, Lydon, Sinéad, & O'Connor, Paul. (2020). The application of human reliability analysis to three critical care procedures. Reliability Engineering & System Safety, 203, doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ress.2020.107116en_IE
dc.identifier.issn0951-8320
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/16312
dc.description.abstractBackground: Procedures carried out in the intensive care unit are prone to human error. Standardisation has been suggested as an approach for reducing errors. This study used human reliability analysis methodologies to examine commonly performed critical care procedures: endotracheal suctioning; ultrasound-guided right internal jugular vein cannulation; and rapid-sequence intubation.Methods: The subgoals, or individual steps, required to complete the three procedures were identified using hierarchical task analysis. The systematic human error reduction and prediction approach was then used to identify potential human errors at each subgoal, the level of risk and how these potential errors could be prevented.Results: Endotracheal suctioning procedure was broken down into 129 subgoals, of which 49 (38.0%) were high-risk. Ultrasound-guided right internal jugular venous cannulation was divided into 224 subgoals, of which 131 (58.4%) were medium-risk, and 20 (8.9%) were identified as high-risk. Rapid sequence intubation was divided into 167 subgoals. A total of 73 (43.7%) of these subgoals were judged to be high-risk.Conclusions: The use of human reliability analysis techniques can support healthcare professionals to gain an indepth understanding of how particular procedures are carried out in order to reduce the risk of, and improve training in, how to perform these procedures.en_IE
dc.description.sponsorshipThe study was partially supported by funding from the Irish Health Research Board (Grant no. HRA-HSR-2015-1071)en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherElsevieren_IE
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Reliability Engineering and System Safetyen
dc.subjectHuman reliability analysisen_IE
dc.subjectHierarchical task analysisen_IE
dc.subjectCritical careen_IE
dc.subjectIntensive careen_IE
dc.subjectHuman erroren_IE
dc.subjectCOGNITIVE TASK-ANALYSISen_IE
dc.subjectAIRWAY MANAGEMENTen_IE
dc.subjectEDUCATIONen_IE
dc.subjectERRORSen_IE
dc.titleThe application of human reliability analysis to three critical care proceduresen_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2020-11-18T15:17:00Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ress.2020.107116
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ress.2020.107116en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.contributor.funderHealth Research Boarden_IE
dc.description.embargo2022-07-10
dc.internal.rssid22841013
dc.local.contactPaul O'Connor, General Practice, School Of Medicine, Clinical Science Inst, Nui Galway. 2897 Email: paul.oconnor@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
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