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dc.contributor.authorKenny, Kate
dc.contributor.authorBushnell, Alexis
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-27T12:50:02Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-22
dc.identifier.citationKenny, Kate, & Bushnell, Alexis. (2020). How to Whistle-Blow: Dissensus and Demand. Journal of Business Ethics, 164(4), 643-656. doi: 10.1007/s10551-019-04401-7en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1573-0697
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/16148
dc.description.abstractWhat makes an external whistleblower effective? Whistleblowers represent an important conduit for dissensus, providing valuable information about ethical breaches and organizational wrongdoing. They often speak out about injustice from a relatively weak position of power, with the aim of changing the status quo. But many external whistleblowers fail in this attempt to make their claims heard and thus secure change. Some can experience severe retaliation and public blacklisting, while others are ignored. This article examines how whistleblowers can succeed in bringing their claims to the public’s attention. We draw on analyses of political struggle by Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe. Specifically, we propose that through the raising of a demand, the whistleblowing subject can emerge as part of a chain of equivalences, in a counter-hegemonic movement that challenges the status quo. An analysis of a high-profile case of tax justice whistleblowing-that of Rudolf Elmer-illustrates our argument. Our proposed theoretical framing builds upon and contributes to literature on whistleblowing as organizational parrhesia by demonstrating how parrhesiastic demand might lead to change in public perception through the formation of alliances with other disparate interests—albeit that the process is precarious and complex. Practically, our article illuminates a persistent concern for those engaged in dissensus via whistleblowing, and whose actions are frequently ignored or silenced. We demonstrate how such actions can move towards securing public support in order to make a difference and achieve change.en_IE
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by NUI Galway’s Millennium Granten_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherSpringeren_IE
dc.relation.ispartofJournal Of Business Ethicsen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ie/
dc.subjectwhistlebloweren_IE
dc.subjectwhistleblowingen_IE
dc.subjectDemanden_IE
dc.subjectdissensusen_IE
dc.subjecthegemonyen_IE
dc.subjectLaclau and Mouffeen_IE
dc.subjectparrhesiaen_IE
dc.titleHow to whistle-blow: Dissensus and demanden_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2020-08-25T09:28:56Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10551-019-04401-7
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-019-04401-7en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.contributor.funderNational University of Ireland Galway Millennium Granten_IE
dc.description.embargo2021-01-22
dc.internal.rssid19903190
dc.local.contactKate Kenny, Je Cairnes School Of Business An, Nui Galway, University Road, Galway. 3472 Email: kate.kenny@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
nui.item.downloads60


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland