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dc.contributor.authorWhelan, Eoin
dc.contributor.authorIslam, A.K.M Najmul
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Stoney
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-05T11:18:28Z
dc.date.available2020-06-05T11:18:28Z
dc.date.issued2020-02-21
dc.identifier.citationWhelan, Eoin, Najmul Islam, A. K. M., & Brooks, Stoney. (2020). Is boredom proneness related to social media overload and fatigue? A stress–strain–outcome approach. Internet Research, 30(3), 869-887. doi:10.1108/INTR-03-2019-0112en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1066-2243
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/16011
dc.description.abstractPurpose Social media overload and fatigue have become common phenomena that are negatively affecting people's well-being and productivity. It is, therefore, important to understand the causes of social media overload and fatigue. One of the reasons why many people engage with social media is to avoid boredom. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how boredom proneness relates to social media overload and fatigue. Design/methodology/approach Building on the stress–strain–outcome framework, this paper tests a model hypothesizing the relationships between a social media user's boredom proneness, information and communication overload, and social media fatigue. The study tests the model by collecting data from 286 social media users. Findings The results suggest a strong association between boredom proneness and both information and communication overload, which, in turn, are strongly associated with social media fatigue. In addition, social media usage was found to amplify the effects of information overload on social media fatigue, but, unexpectedly, attenuates the effects of communication overload. Originality/value Prior research has largely overlooked the connection between boredom and problematic social media use. The present study addresses this important gap by developing and testing a research model relating boredom proneness to social media overload and fatigue.en_IE
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by the Irish Research Council.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherEmeralden_IE
dc.relation.ispartofInternet Researchen
dc.subjectoverloaden_IE
dc.subjectfatigueen_IE
dc.subjectInformation overloaden_IE
dc.subjectCommunication overloaden_IE
dc.subjectSocial media fatigueen_IE
dc.subjectSocial mediaen_IE
dc.subjectBoredomen_IE
dc.titleIs boredom proneness related to social media overload and fatigue? A stress–strain–outcome approachen_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2020-06-05T08:12:32Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/INTR-03-2019-0112
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://doi.org/10.1108/INTR-03-2019-0112en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.contributor.funderIrish Research Councilen_IE
dc.internal.rssid19531024
dc.local.contactEoin Whelan, Business Info Systems Group, J.E Cairnes School Of Business, & Economics, Room 361, Nui Galway. 4224 Email: eoin.whelan@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
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