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dc.contributor.authorSmith-Christmas, Cassie
dc.contributor.authorNicLeòid, Sìleas L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-28T15:40:44Z
dc.date.issued2020-02-14
dc.identifier.citationSmith-Christmas, Cassie, & NicLeòid, Sìleas L. (2020). How to turn the tide: the policy implications emergent from comparing a ‘post-vernacular FLP’ to a ‘pro-Gaelic FLP’. Language Policy. doi: 10.1007/s10993-019-09541-0en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1573-1863
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/15821
dc.description.abstractThis paper compares the sociolinguistic trajectory of a latent speaker mother to that of a new speaker mother. Drawing on Shandler (TDR 48(1):19 43, 2004), it introduces the term post-vernacular FLP as a means to conceptualise the latent speaker mother s emblematic use of Gaelic with her child as a seed from which language revitalisation can be cultivated, rather than a terminus. The paper discusses how the latent speaker mother s current ideological landscape in many ways encapsulates the tepidity of the older generation s ideologies. This contrasts to the new speaker mother, who has undergone the ideological transformation necessary to take an activist stance towards the language and implement a pro-Gaelic FLP. The paper then considers the linguistic confdence barrier as described by both mothers, particularly in terms of using child-directed speech in Gaelic, and shows how the new speaker mother overcame this particular barrier. The paper concludes by discussing the policy implications of this analysis, and poses the crucial question: what specifc on-the-ground measures can be taken to transform post-vernacular FLPs to pro-Gaelic FLPs?en_IE
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research that forms the basis of this article was made possible by the Irish Research Council [Grant Number GOIPD/2016/644]. The research was also supported by Soillse. The writing of this article was also supported by a fellowship with the Smithsonian Centre for Folklife and Cultural Heritage under the ‘Sustaining Minoritized Languages in Europe’ (‘SMiLE’ initiative). We would also like to thank our anonymous reviewers and James Costa for reading an earlier draft of this article. Any mistakes are of course our own.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagen_IE
dc.relation.ispartofLanguage Policyen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ie/
dc.subjectFamily language policyen_IE
dc.subjectPost-vernacularen_IE
dc.subjectNew speakersen_IE
dc.subjectLatenten_IE
dc.subjectspeakersen_IE
dc.subjectScottish Gaelicen_IE
dc.titleHow to turn the tide: the policy implications emergent from comparing a ‘post-vernacular FLP’ to a ‘pro-Gaelic FLP’en_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2020-02-25T17:38:21Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10993-019-09541-0
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10993-019-09541-0en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.contributor.funderIrish Research Councilen_IE
dc.contributor.funderSoillseen_IE
dc.contributor.funderSmithsonian Centre for Folklife and Cultural Heritageen_IE
dc.description.embargo2021-02-14
dc.internal.rssid19982667
dc.local.contactCassandra Smith-Christmas. Email: cassandra.smith-christmas@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
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