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dc.contributor.authorLi, Jun
dc.contributor.authorDoyle, Karen M.
dc.contributor.authorTatlisumak, Turgut
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-27T12:20:50Z
dc.date.available2020-01-27T12:20:50Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationJun, Li, Karen, M. Doyle, & Turgut, Tatlisumak. (2007). Polyamines in the Brain: Distribution, Biological Interactions, and their Potential Therapeutic Role in Brain Ischaemia. Current Medicinal Chemistry, 14(17), 1807-1813. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/092986707781058841en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1875-533X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/15741
dc.description.abstractThe endogenous polyamines (spermine, spermidine, and putrescine) are present at relatively high concentrations in the mammalian brain and play crucial roles in a variety of aspects of cell functioning. Stroke is the third most common cause of death and the leading cause of disability among adults in the western world. Brain polyamine levels change dramatically following cerebral ischaemia. Polyamines may be involved in the pathophysiological processes underlying brain ischaemia through several possible mechanisms. These include direct effects on ion channels and receptors modulating potassium, and most importantly calcium trafficking, or through the production of toxic metabolites. Considerable evidence shows that the noncompetitive polyamine antagonists, ifenprodil and eliprodil, are neuroprotective. Interestingly, novel polyamine analogues, such as N1-dansylspermine, BU36b, and BU43b, have also recently been shown to have neuroprotective potential. The exact mechanisms of the neuroprotection afforded by the polyamine antagonists and their clinical applicability is worthy of further study.en_IE
dc.description.sponsorshipDr. Tatlisumak was supported by the Helsinki University Central Hospital, the University of Helsinki, the Finnish Academy of Sciences, and the Sigrid Juselius Foundation. The authors express their most sincere respects and gratitude to late Professor GG Shaw of Trinity College, Ireland, a great teacher and scientist who left us at his most productive age.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherBentham Science Publishersen_IE
dc.relation.ispartofCurr Med Chem.en
dc.subjectPolyamineen_IE
dc.subjectbrainen_IE
dc.subjectCNSen_IE
dc.subjectstrokeen_IE
dc.subjecttherapeuticsen_IE
dc.subjectneurotoxicityen_IE
dc.subjectNMDAen_IE
dc.titlePolyamines in the brain: distribution, biological interactions, and their potential therapeutic role in brain ischaemiaen_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2020-01-27T12:04:56Z
dc.identifier.doi10.2174/092986707781058841
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://dx.doi.org/10.2174/092986707781058841en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.contributor.funderHelsinki University Central Hospitalen_IE
dc.contributor.funderUniversity of Helsinkien_IE
dc.contributor.funderFinnish Academy of Sciencesen_IE
dc.contributor.funderSigrid Juselius Foundationen_IE
dc.internal.rssid1161957
dc.local.contactKaren Doyle, Dept. Of Physiology, Human Biology Building, Nui Galway. 3665 Email: karen.doyle@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
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