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dc.contributor.authorGrogan, D.M.
dc.contributor.authorFlanagan, M.
dc.contributor.authorWalls, M.
dc.contributor.authorLeen, Sean B.
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Noel H.
dc.contributor.authorMamalis, D.
dc.contributor.authorGoggins, Jamie
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-02T16:05:33Z
dc.date.available2019-12-02T16:05:33Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-06
dc.identifier.citationGrogan, D., Flanagan, M., Walls, M., Leen, S., Doyle, A., Harrison, N., Mamalis, D., Goggins, J. (2018). Influence of microstructural defects and hydrostatic pressure on water absorption in composite materials for tidal energy. Journal of Composite Materials, 52(21), 2899–2917. https://doi.org/10.1177/0021998318755428en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1530-793X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/15606
dc.description.abstractThe lifespan and economic viability of tidal energy devices are constrained, in part, by the complex degradation of the tidal turbine blade materials due to prolonged immersion in a hostile sub-sea environment. Seawater penetration is a significant degradation mechanism in composite materials. This work aims to investigate the influence of microstructure and hydrostatic pressure on water absorption in four polymer composites which are candidate materials for use in tidal energy devices. These materials are: a glass fibre powder epoxy, a carbon fibre powder epoxy, glass fibre Ampreg epoxy and a chopped fibre glass fibre Polyether Ether Ketone. X-ray computed tomography is used to characterise the voids, resin-rich areas and other manufacturing defects present in each material. These defects are known to significantly alter the rate of moisture diffusion, as well as the total uptake of water at saturation. The samples are then exposed to accelerated water aging and hydrostatic pressurisation in order to simulate a range of expected sub-sea operating conditions. The material micro-structure, the matrix material and pressurisation level are shown to strongly influence both the moisture absorption rate and total water uptake. Significant volumetric changes are also noted for all samples, both during and after aging. X-ray computed tomography scans of specimens also provide a unique insight into the role of voids in storing water once a material has reached saturation.en_IE
dc.description.sponsorshipThe author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This research was partly funded by Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) through the Marine and Renewable Energy Ireland (MaREI) research centre (Grant no. 12/RC/2302), the Irish Research Council (IRC) through the employment-based postgraduate scheme and by MARINCOMP – Novel Composite Materials and Processes for Marine Renewable Energy (EU FP7 – People, Industry Academia Partnerships and Pathways (IAPP), reference: 612531). The last author would like to acknowledge the support of Science Foundation Ireland through the Career Development Award programme (Grant No. 13/CDA/2200).en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_IE
dc.relation.ispartofJournal Of Composite Materialsen
dc.subjectPolymer compositesen_IE
dc.subjecttidal turbine bladeen_IE
dc.subjectwater agingen_IE
dc.subjectX-ray computed tomographyen_IE
dc.subjectocean energyen_IE
dc.subjectmanufacturing defectsen_IE
dc.subjectcomposite voidsen_IE
dc.subjectMECHANICAL-PROPERTIESen_IE
dc.subjectMOISTURE ABSORPTIONen_IE
dc.subjectDESIGN METHODOLOGYen_IE
dc.subjectDAMAGEen_IE
dc.subjectBEHAVIORen_IE
dc.subjectDIFFUSIONen_IE
dc.subjectSTRENGTHen_IE
dc.titleInfluence of microstructural defects and hydrostatic pressure on water absorption in composite materials for tidal energyen_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2019-11-26T18:04:56Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0021998318755428
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://doi.org/10.1177/0021998318755428en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.contributor.funderScience Foundation Irelanden_IE
dc.contributor.funderIrish Research Councilen_IE
dc.contributor.funderSeventh Framework Programmeen_IE
dc.internal.rssid15346244
dc.local.contactSean Leen, Mechanical & Biomedical Eng, Eng-2051, New Engineering Building, Nui Galway. 5955 Email: sean.leen@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
dcterms.projectinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/12/RC/2302/IE/Marine Renewable Energy Ireland (MaREI) - The SFI Centre for Marine Renewable Energy Research/en_IE
dcterms.projectinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7::SP3::PEOPLE/612531/EU/Novel Composite Materials and Processes for Offshore Renewable Energy/MARINCOMPen_IE
dcterms.projectinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Career Development Award/13/CDA/2200/IE/Achieving nearly zero energy buildings - A life cycle assessment approach to retrofitting existing buildings (acronym: nZEB-RETROFIT)/en_IE
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