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dc.contributor.authorMadigan, Nicolas N.
dc.contributor.authorChen, Bingkun K.
dc.contributor.authorKnight, Andrew M.
dc.contributor.authorRooney, Gemma E.
dc.contributor.authorSweeney, Eva
dc.contributor.authorKinnavane, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorYaszemski, Michael J.
dc.contributor.authorDockery, Peter
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Timothy
dc.contributor.authorMcMahon, Siobhan S.
dc.contributor.authorWindebank, Anthony J.
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-26T11:47:01Z
dc.date.available2019-08-26T11:47:01Z
dc.date.issued2014-08-08
dc.identifier.citationMadigan, Nicolas N., Chen, Bingkun K., Knight, Andrew M., Rooney, Gemma E., Sweeney, Eva, Kinnavane, Lisa, Yaszemski, Michael J., Dockery, Peter, O'Brien, Timothy, McMahon, Siobhan S., Windebank, Anthony J. (2014). Comparison of Cellular Architecture, Axonal Growth, and Blood Vessel Formation Through Cell-Loaded Polymer Scaffolds in the Transected Rat Spinal Cord. Tissue Engineering Part A, 20(21-22), 2985-2997. doi: 10.1089/ten.tea.2013.0551en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1557-8690
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/15344
dc.description.abstractThe use of multichannel polymer scaffolds in a complete spinal cord transection injury serves as a deconstructed model that allows for control of individual variables and direct observation of their effects on regeneration. In this study, scaffolds fabricated from positively charged oligo[poly(ethylene glycol)fumarate] (OPF+) hydrogel were implanted into rat spinal cords following T9 complete transection. OPF+ scaffold channels were loaded with either syngeneic Schwann cells or mesenchymal stem cells derived from enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic rats (eGFP-MSCs). Control scaffolds contained extracellular matrix only. The capacity of each scaffold type to influence the architecture of regenerated tissue after 4 weeks was examined by detailed immunohistochemistry and stereology. Astrocytosis was observed in a circumferential peripheral channel compartment. A structurally separate channel core contained scattered astrocytes, eGFP-MSCs, blood vessels, and regenerating axons. Cells double-staining with glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) and S-100 antibodies populated each scaffold type, demonstrating migration of an immature cell phenotype into the scaffold from the animal. eGFP-MSCs were distributed in close association with blood vessels. Axon regeneration was augmented by Schwann cell implantation, while eGFP-MSCs did not support axon growth. Methods of unbiased stereology provided physiologic estimates of blood vessel volume, length and surface area, mean vessel diameter, and cross-sectional area in each scaffold type. Schwann cell scaffolds had high numbers of small, densely packed vessels within the channels. eGFP-MSC scaffolds contained fewer, larger vessels. There was a positive linear correlation between axon counts and vessel length density, surface density, and volume fraction. Increased axon number also correlated with decreasing vessel diameter, implicating the importance of blood flow rate. Radial diffusion distances in vessels significantly correlated to axon number as a hyperbolic function, showing a need to engineer high numbers of small vessels in parallel to improving axonal densities. In conclusion, Schwann cells and eGFP-MSCs influenced the regenerating microenvironment with lasting effect on axonal and blood vessel growth. OPF+ scaffolds in a complete transection model allowed for a detailed comparative, histologic analysis of the cellular architecture in response to each cell type and provided insight into physiologic characteristics that may support axon regeneration.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherMary Ann Lieberten_IE
dc.relation.ispartofTissue Engineering Part Aen
dc.subjectMESENCHYMAL STEM-CELLSen_IE
dc.subjectMARROW STROMAL CELLSen_IE
dc.subjectCHRONIC PARAPLEGIC RATSen_IE
dc.subjectBONE-MARROWen_IE
dc.subjectSCHWANN-CELLSen_IE
dc.subjectFUNCTIONAL RECOVERYen_IE
dc.subjectIN-VITROen_IE
dc.subjectENGINEERED SCAFFOLDSen_IE
dc.subjectCHONDROITINASE ABCen_IE
dc.subjectCONTROLLED-RELEASEen_IE
dc.titleComparison of cellular architecture, axonal growth, and blood vessel formation through cell-loaded polymer scaffolds in the transected rat spinal corden_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2016-05-16T13:38:48Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/ten.tea.2013.0551
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://doi.org/10.1089/ten.tea.2013.0551en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.internal.rssid7955785
dc.local.contactSiobhan Mcmahon, Department Of Anatomy, Nui, Galway. 2838 Email: siobhan.mcmahon@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes
dc.local.versionPUBLISHED
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