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dc.contributor.authorHealy, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorCarbone, Chris
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Andrew L.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-20T08:08:55Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-07
dc.identifier.citationHealy, Kevin, Carbone, Chris, & Jackson, Andrew L. (2019). Snake venom potency and yield are associated with prey-evolution, predator metabolism and habitat structure. Ecology Letters, 22(3), 527-537. doi: 10.1111/ele.13216en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1461-0248
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/15180
dc.description.abstractSnake venom is well known for its ability to incapacitate and kill prey. Yet, potency and the amount of venom available varies greatly across species, ranging from the seemingly harmless to those capable of killing vast numbers of potential prey. This variation is poorly understood, with comparative approaches confounded by the use of atypical prey species as models to measure venom potency. Here, we account for such confounding issues by incorporating the phylogenetic similarity between a snake's diet and the species used to measure its potency. In a comparative analysis of 102 species we show that snake venom potency is generally prey‐specific. We also show that venom yields are lower in species occupying three dimensional environments and increases with body size corresponding to metabolic rate, but faster than predicted from increases in prey size. These results underline the importance of physiological and environmental factors in the evolution of predator traits.en_IE
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank several people for useful discussions that have helped develop this project including Natalie Cooper, Yvonne Buckley, Deirdre McClean and the members of NERD club. This work was funded by Science Foundation Ireland (K.H) and the Earth and Natural Sciences Doctoral Studies Programme with the Higher Education Authority through the Programme for Research at Third Level Institutions, Cycle 5 (PRTLI‐5), and co‐funded by the European Regional Development Fund, and the Marie Curie Research Grants Scheme, grant (749594) (K.H.). We are grateful to Kevin Arbuckle and all the anonymous reviewers who provided very detailed and constructive comments on earlier versions.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherWileyen_IE
dc.relation.ispartofEcology Lettersen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ie/
dc.subjectBody sizeen_IE
dc.subjectcomparative analysisen_IE
dc.subjectLD50en_IE
dc.subjectmacroecologyen_IE
dc.subjectphylogenetic analysisen_IE
dc.subjectscalingen_IE
dc.subjectsnakeen_IE
dc.subjecttrophic ecologyen_IE
dc.subjectvenomen_IE
dc.titleSnake venom potency and yield are associated with prey‐evolution, predator metabolism and habitat structureen_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2019-05-17T15:15:26Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ele.13216
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://doi.org/10.1111/ele.13216
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.contributor.funderScience Foundation Irelanden_IE
dc.contributor.funderEuropean Regional Development Funden_IE
dc.contributor.funderHigher Education Authority, Programme for Research at Third Level Institutions, Cycle 5 (PRTLI‐5)en_IE
dc.contributor.funderNational University of Ireland, Galwayen_IE
dc.description.embargo2020-01-07
dc.internal.rssid16255172
dc.local.contactKevin Healy. Email: kevin.healy@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes
dc.local.versionSUBMITTED
dcterms.projectinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020::MSCA-IF-EF-ST/749594/EU/Determining the drivers and importance of scavenging behaviors in a changing world using agent based modeling approaches./SCAVENGERen_IE
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