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dc.contributor.authorPankratova, Galina
dc.contributor.authorLeech, Dónal
dc.contributor.authorGorton, Lo
dc.contributor.authorHederstedt, Lars
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-18T14:15:17Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-10
dc.identifier.citationPankratova, Galina, Leech, Dónal, Gorton, Lo, & Hederstedt, Lars. (2018). Extracellular Electron Transfer by the Gram-Positive Bacterium Enterococcus faecalis. Biochemistry, 57(30), 4597-4603. doi: 10.1021/acs.biochem.8b00600en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1520-4995
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/14967
dc.description.abstractExtracellular electron transfer (EET) in microbial cells is essential for certain biotechnological applications and contributes to the biogeochemical cycling of elements and syntrophic microbial metabolism in complex natural environments. The Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Enterococcus faecalis, an opportunistic human pathogen, is shown to be able to transfer electrons generated in fermentation metabolism to electrodes directly and indirectly via mediators. By exploiting E. faecalis wild-type and mutant cells, we demonstrate that reduced demethylmenaquinone in the respiratory chain in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane is crucial for the EET. Heme proteins are not involved, and cytochrome bd oxidase activity was found to attenuate EET. These results are significant for the mechanistic understanding of EET in bacteria and for the design of microbial electrochemical systems. The basic findings infer that in dense microbial communities, such as in biofilm and in the large intestine, metabolism in E. faecalis and similar Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria might be electrically connected to other microbes. Such a transcellular electron transfer might confer syntrophic metabolism that promotes growth and other activities of bacteria in the microbiota of humans and animals.en_IE
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors thank Mark Huycke (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK) for generously providing strain WY84, Astrid Teubenbacher for technical assistance, and Dr. Peter Ó Conghaile (National University of Ireland Galway) for Os RP synthesis.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Societyen_IE
dc.relation.ispartofBiochemistryen
dc.subjectMICROBIAL FUEL-CELLen_IE
dc.subjectREDOX POLYMERSen_IE
dc.subjectELECTROCHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONen_IE
dc.subjectTRANSFER MECHANISMSen_IE
dc.subjectOXYGEN REDUCTASESen_IE
dc.subjectMICROORGANISMSen_IE
dc.subjectCOMMUNITIESen_IE
dc.subjectCONSORTIAen_IE
dc.subjectQUINONESen_IE
dc.subjectSURFACESen_IE
dc.titleExtracellular electron transfer by the gram-positive bacterium enterococcus faecalisen_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2019-02-15T14:53:31Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/acs.biochem.8b00600
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.biochem.8b00600en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.description.embargo2019-07-10
dc.internal.rssid14827143
dc.local.contactDonal Leech, School Of Chemistry, Room C228 Arts/Science Building, University Road, Nui Galway. 5349 Email: donal.leech@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
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