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dc.contributor.authorReid, Lindsay Ann
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-17T16:13:16Z
dc.date.available2019-01-17T16:13:16Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-02
dc.identifier.citationReid, Lindsay Ann. (2018). Ovidian Retro-Metamorphosis on the Elizabethan Stage. Early Theatre, 21(2). doi: 10.12745/et.21.2.3559en_IE
dc.identifier.issn2293-7609
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/14817
dc.description.abstractAlthough Ovid dedicated his Metamorphoses to the subject of change, the vast majority of the corporeal alterations catalogued in this ancient Roman poem are singular, permanent transformations. In contrast, dramatists writing for the Elizabethan stage tended to represent fantastical, neo-Ovidian metamorphoses as temporary and reversible. With particular reference to the plays of John Lyly and especially Love s Metamorphosis this article exposes conceptual and generic deviations between the static post-metamorphic norm found in Ovid s Latin poetry and Elizabethan England s theatrical depictions of bodily retro-metamorphoses.en_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherMcMaster University Library Press and Becker Associatesen_IE
dc.relation.ispartofEarly Theatreen
dc.subjectOviden_IE
dc.subjectTransformationen_IE
dc.subjectMetamorphosesen_IE
dc.subjectJohn Lylyen_IE
dc.subjectElizabethan dramaen_IE
dc.subjectAdaptationen_IE
dc.subjectClassical receptionen_IE
dc.subjectMythologyen_IE
dc.subjectLove's metamorphosisen_IE
dc.titleOvidian retro-metamorphosis on the Elizabethan stageen_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2019-01-09T18:12:12Z
dc.identifier.doi10.12745/et.21.2.3559
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://doi.org/10.12745/et.21.2.3559en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.description.embargo2019-12-27
dc.internal.rssid14956918
dc.local.contactLindsay Ann Reid, English, College Of Arts,Social Science, And Celtic Studies, Nui Galway. Email: lindsay.reid@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes This published version can be uploaded to the repository, but it needs to be embargoed until 27 December 2019. The full terms of copyright and distribution related to this publication are as follows: Effective December 2017, contributors to Early Theatre retain full copyright for their work. All published authors are required to grant a limited exclusive license to the journal. According to the terms of this license, authors agree that for one year following publication in Early Theatre, the
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