Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBromley, Gordon R.M.
dc.contributor.authorPutnam, Aaron E.
dc.contributor.authorBorns Jr, H.
dc.contributor.authorLowell, T.
dc.contributor.authorSandford, T.
dc.contributor.authorBarrell, D.
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-10T12:12:34Z
dc.date.available2019-01-10T12:12:34Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-06
dc.identifier.citationBromley, G., Putnam, A., Borns Jr, H., Lowell, T., Sandford, T., & Barrell, D. (2018). Interstadial Rise and Younger Dryas Demise of Scotland's Last Ice Fields. Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology, 33(4), 412-429. doi:10.1002/2018PA003341en_IE
dc.identifier.issn0883-8305
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/14775
dc.description.abstractEstablishing the atmospheric expression of abrupt climate change during the last glacial termination is key to understanding driving mechanisms. In this paper, we present a new 14C chronology of glacier behavior during late-glacial time from the Scottish Highlands, located close to the overturning region of the North Atlantic Ocean. Our results indicate that the last pulse of glaciation culminated between ~12.8 and ~12.6 ka, during the earliest part of the Younger Dryas stadial and as much as a millennium earlier than several recent estimates. Comparison of our results with existing minimum-limiting 14C data also suggests that the subsequent deglaciation of Scotland was rapid and occurred during full stadial conditions in the North Atlantic. We attribute this pattern of ice recession to enhanced summertime melting, despite severely cool winters, and propose that relatively warm summers are a fundamental characteristic of North Atlantic stadials.en_IE
dc.description.sponsorshiphis work was supported by NSF grant EAR‐9118375 and National Geographic/WAITT Foundation grant 450‐16. A.E. Putnam acknowledges support from the Comer Family Foundation, the Lenfest Foundation, a Lamont‐Doherty Earth Observatory postdoctoral fellowship, and NSF grant EAR‐1554990. The data reported and discussed in this paper are listed in the references, tables, and supporting information.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen_IE
dc.relation.ispartofPaleoceanography and Paleoclimatologyen
dc.subjectAbrupt climate changeen_IE
dc.subjectYounger Dryasen_IE
dc.subjectglacial geologyen_IE
dc.subjectScotlanden_IE
dc.subjectseasonalityen_IE
dc.titleInterstadial rise and Younger Dryas demise of Scotland's last ice fieldsen_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2018-12-27T21:39:18Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2018PA003341
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://doi.org/10.1002/2018PA003341en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.internal.rssid14276065
dc.local.contactGordon Bromley, -. - Email: gordon.bromley@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
nui.item.downloads75


Files in this item

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland
This item is available under the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland. No item may be reproduced for commercial purposes. Please refer to the publisher's URL where this is made available, or to notes contained in the item itself. Other terms may apply.

The following license files are associated with this item:

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record