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dc.contributor.authorComber, Michelle
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-16T15:51:37Z
dc.date.available2018-10-16T15:51:37Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationComber, Michelle (2018) 'Central Places in a rural archaeological landscape'. Journal Of The North Atlantic, 36 :1-12.en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1935-1984
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/14613
dc.description.abstractArchaeological survey in western Ireland has identified the existence of clusters of activity within the mapped landscapes of the 5th to 12th centuries A.D. Exploring this further, it is possible to identify elements characteristic of such clusters, and discuss the possible significance of such places. The basics of German geographer Walter Christaller’s Central Place Theory provide an interesting analytical tool in this regard. Although a spatial theory developed in the study of urban geography, some elements of Christaller’s work have been applied to urban archaeological landscapes in recent times. Their application in the rural ringfort landscapes of western Ireland proves an interesting exercise, one that suggests that Central Places also existed in more dispersed, rural communities in Early Medieval Ireland.en_IE
dc.description.sponsorshipThanks are due to a number of funding bodies and archaeological professionals—the Heritage Council of Ireland funded the initial phases of survey, and the Royal Irish Academy the excavation of the sub-square cashel. Excavation at Caherconnell Cashel is made possible by the Caherconnell Archaeological Field School and the Davoren family who own the land (with early excavations undertaken in conjunction with Graham Hull and TVAS Ireland). An anonymous donation to the Department of Archaeology at NUI, Galway has allowed the final completion of the survey and the creation of some of the maps included here. Survey work was undertaken in conjunction with Liam Hickey, Nick Hogan, Cormac Bruton, Paul Naessens, and Noel McCarthy. Thanks also to manuscript editor Carleton Jones and two referees for their part in improving this paper.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherEagle Hill Instituteen_IE
dc.relation.ispartofJournal Of The North Atlanticen
dc.subjectCentral placesen_IE
dc.subjectcashelen_IE
dc.subjectringforten_IE
dc.subjectBurrenen_IE
dc.titleCentral places in a rural archaeological landscapeen_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2018-10-16T15:01:45Z
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://www.eaglehill.us/JONAonline2/access-pages/36-comber-accesspage.shtmlen_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.contributor.funderHeritage Council of Irelanden_IE
dc.contributor.funderRoyal Irish Academyen_IE
dc.internal.rssid14956889
dc.local.contactMichelle Comber, Centre For Irish Studies, Room 204, Martha Fox House, Distillery Road, Nui Galway. 2887 Email: michelle.comber@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes Email from journal: 'are welcome to post on your personal webpages and that of your home institutions'
dc.local.versionPUBLISHED
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