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dc.contributor.authorHoldt, Susan Løvstad
dc.contributor.authorKraan, Stefan
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-20T16:11:14Z
dc.date.available2018-09-20T16:11:14Z
dc.date.issued2011-02-09
dc.identifier.citationHoldt, Susan Løvstad; Kraan, Stefan (2011). Bioactive compounds in seaweed: functional food applications and legislation. Journal of Applied Phycology 23 (3), 543-597
dc.identifier.issn0921-8971,1573-5176
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/11965
dc.description.abstractSeaweed is more than the wrap that keeps rice together in sushi. Seaweed biomass is already used for a wide range of other products in food, including stabilising agents. Biorefineries with seaweed as feedstock are attracting worldwide interest and include low-volume, high value-added products and vice versa. Scientific research on bioactive compounds in seaweed usually takes place on just a few species and compounds. This paper reviews worldwide research on bioactive compounds, mainly of nine genera or species of seaweed, which are also available in European temperate Atlantic waters, i.e. Laminaria sp., Fucus sp., Ascophyllum nodosum, Chondrus crispus, Porphyra sp., Ulva sp., Sargassum sp., Gracilaria sp. and Palmaria palmata. In addition, Undaria pinnatifida is included in this review as this is globally one of the most commonly produced, investigated and available species. Fewer examples of other species abundant worldwide have also been included. This review will supply fundamental information for biorefineries in Atlantic Europe using seaweed as feedstock. Preliminary selection of one or several candidate seaweed species will be possible based on the summary tables and previous research described in this review. This applies either to the choice of high value-added bioactive products to be exploited in an available species or to the choice of seaweed species when a bioactive compound is desired. Data are presented in tables with species, effect and test organism (if present) with examples of uses to enhance comparisons. In addition, scientific experiments performed on seaweed used as animal feed are presented, and EU, US and Japanese legislation on functional foods is reviewed.
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Applied Phycology
dc.subjecthigh value-added products
dc.subjecthealth promotion
dc.subjectbiorefinery
dc.subjectnutraceutical
dc.subjectpharmaceutical
dc.subjectfeed supplement
dc.subjectred-sea bream
dc.subjectundaria-pinnatifida wakame
dc.subjectspontaneously hypertensive-rats
dc.subjectmarine natural-products
dc.subjectfatty-acid-composition
dc.subjectactive sulfated polysaccharides
dc.subjectvitro protein digestibility
dc.subjectenzyme inhibitory peptides
dc.subjectalga gracilaria-verrucosa
dc.subjectfish pathogenic bacteria
dc.titleBioactive compounds in seaweed: functional food applications and legislation
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10811-010-9632-5
dc.local.publishedsourcehttp://orbit.dtu.dk/en/publications/bioactive-compounds-in-seaweed-functional-food-applications-and-legislation(3b089d65-179a-4763-90d0-343a4ecdded1).html
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