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dc.contributor.authorCeredig, Rhodri
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-20T16:02:58Z
dc.date.available2018-09-20T16:02:58Z
dc.date.issued2012-01-01
dc.identifier.citationCeredig, Rhodri (2012). When one cell is enough. Stem Cell Research & Therapy 3 ,
dc.identifier.issn1757-6512
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/10732
dc.description.abstractFor many years, the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) has been well characterized in mice as a cell that can singly reconstitute the whole hematopoietic system of primary recipient animals as well as that of secondary hosts. That clinical bone marrow transplantation is a successful treatment strategy is indirect evidence that such a cell exists in humans. To date, similar criteria have not been applied to human HSCs. However, using a humanized mouse model of xenotransplantation, a recent paper shows that single human cells can fully reconstitute the lymphomyeloid system of primary recipient animals and, in some cases, that of secondary hosts.
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.relation.ispartofStem Cell Research & Therapy
dc.subjecthematopoietic stem-cells
dc.subjectmice
dc.titleWhen one cell is enough
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/scrt92
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://stemcellres.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/scrt92?site=stemcellres.biomedcentral.com
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