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dc.contributor.authorWallace, Elaine
dc.contributor.authorHogan, Michael
dc.contributor.authorNoone, Chris
dc.contributor.authorGroarke, Jenny
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-06T08:59:26Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-24
dc.identifier.citationWallace, Elaine, Hogan, Michael, Noone, Chris, & Groarke, Jenny. (2018). Investigating components and causes of sabotage by academics using collective intelligence analysis. Studies in Higher Education, 1-19. doi: 10.1080/03075079.2018.1477128en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1470-174X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/10038
dc.description.abstractMentioning products or brands on Facebook enables individuals to display an ideal self to others through a form of virtual conspicuous consumption. Drawing on conspicuous donation behaviour literature, we investigate ‘conspicuous virtue signalling’ (CVS), as conspicuous consumption on Facebook. CVS occurs when an individual mentions a charity on their Facebook profile. We investigate need for uniqueness (NFU) and attention to social comparison information (ATSCI) as antecedents of two types of CVS–self-oriented (to gain intrinsic benefits) and other-oriented (to impress others). We also explore the relationship between CVS and self-esteem, and offline prosocial (donation to the charity) and unethical (counterfeit purchase) behaviour intentions. Data from two studies, a college survey (N = 234) and an adult survey via MTurk (N = 296), were analysed using structural equation modelling. Results indicate that NFU predicts both forms of CVS, while ATSCI influences both forms of CVS for adults and other-oriented CVS for students. Self-esteem is enhanced by self-oriented CVS. Self-oriented CVS predicts donation intention whereas other-oriented CVS significantly reduces donation intention for both samples. Furthermore, a significant relationship between CVS and purchase intention of counterfeit luxury goods is revealed. Findings provide insights into conspicuous virtue signalling and the relationship between CVS on Facebook and offline behavioural intentions.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_IE
dc.relation.ispartofStudies In Higher Educationen
dc.subjectSabotageen_IE
dc.subjectEmployee Performanceen_IE
dc.subjectServicesen_IE
dc.titleInvestigating components and causes of sabotage by academics using collective intelligence analysisen_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2018-09-06T08:06:43Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03075079.2018.1477128
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2018.1477128en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.description.embargo2019-11-24
dc.internal.rssid14331624
dc.local.contactElaine Wallace, Dept. Of Marketing, Room 322, St. Anthony'S, Nui Galway. 2603 Email: elaine.wallace@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
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