Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWallace, Elaine
dc.contributor.authorBuil, Isabel
dc.contributor.authorde Chernatony, Leslie
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-06T08:20:08Z
dc.date.issued2018-08-21
dc.identifier.citationWallace, Elaine, Buil, Isabel, & de Chernatony, Leslie. (2018). ‘Consuming Good’ on Social Media: What Can Conspicuous Virtue Signalling on Facebook Tell Us About Prosocial and Unethical Intentions? Journal of Business Ethics. doi: 10.1007/s10551-018-3999-7en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1573-0697
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/10037
dc.description.abstractMentioning products or brands on Facebook enables individuals to display an ideal self to others through a form of virtual conspicuous consumption. Drawing on conspicuous donation behaviour (CDB) literature, we investigate conspicuous virtue signalling (CVS), as conspicuous consumption on Facebook. CVS occurs when an individual mentions a charity on their Facebook profile. We investigate need for uniqueness (NFU) and attention to social comparison information (ATSCI) as antecedents of two types of CVS self-oriented (to gain intrinsic benefits) and other-oriented (to impress others). We also explore the relationship between CVS and self-esteem, and offline prosocial (donation to the charity) and unethical (counterfeit purchase) behaviour intentions. Data from two studies: a college survey (N = 234), and an adult survey via MTurk (N = 296), were analysed using structural equation modeling. Results indicate that NFU predicts both forms of CVS, while ATSCI influences both forms of CVS for adults and other-oriented CVS for students. Self-esteem is enhanced by self-oriented CVS. Self-oriented CVS predicts donation intention whereas other-oriented CVS significantly reduces donation intention for both samples. Furthermore, a significant relationship between CVS and purchase intention of counterfeit luxury goods is revealed. Findings provide insights into conspicuous virtue signalling and the relationship between CVS on Facebook and offline behavioural intentions.en_IE
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the Government of Spain (ECO2017-82103-P), and the Government of Aragón and the European Social Fund (Project Generés S54_17R).en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagen_IE
dc.relation.ispartofJournal Of Business Ethicsen
dc.subjectConspicuous donation behaviouren_IE
dc.subjectConspicuous virtue signallingen_IE
dc.subjectNeed for uniquenessen_IE
dc.subjectAttention to social comparison informationen_IE
dc.subjectSelf-esteemen_IE
dc.subjectDonation intentionen_IE
dc.subjectCounterfeit purchase intentionen_IE
dc.subjectAbbreviationsen_IE
dc.title'Consuming good' on social media: What can conspicuous virtue signalling on Facebook tell us about prosocial and unethical intentions?en_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2018-09-06T08:05:27Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10551-018-3999-7
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-018-3999-7en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.contributor.funderGovernment of Spainen_IE
dc.contributor.funderGovernment of Aragónen_IE
dc.contributor.funderEuropean Social Funden_IE
dc.description.embargo2019-08-21
dc.internal.rssid14782729
dc.local.contactElaine Wallace, Dept. Of Marketing, Room 322, St. Anthony'S, Nui Galway. 2603 Email: elaine.wallace@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
nui.item.downloads204


Files in this item

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland
This item is available under the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland. No item may be reproduced for commercial purposes. Please refer to the publisher's URL where this is made available, or to notes contained in the item itself. Other terms may apply.

The following license files are associated with this item:

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record