ARAN - Access to Research at NUI Galway

The United States and International Criminal Tribunals

ARAN - Access to Research at NUI Galway

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Schabas, William A
dc.contributor.author Rhea, Harry M
dc.date.accessioned 2012-11-08T16:44:05Z
dc.date.available 2012-11-08T16:44:05Z
dc.date.issued 2012-08-07
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10379/3044
dc.description.abstract This study examines the policies put forth by the United States during international debates that established international criminal tribunals from the pre-First World War era to 2012. Each chapter closely considers the United States¿s role and position during each era. The first chapter covers the era prior to the First World War, including the development of the Lieber Code and the prosecution of Henry Wirz. The second chapter analyzes the United States's position on establishing an international criminal court for the prosecution of Germany's former Emperor, William II, at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919. Chapter three covers the interwar period. Chapter four covers the post-Second World War era and the United States's role in establishing the International Military Tribunal and the International Military Tribunal for the Far East. Chapter five considers the Cold War era and the United States's policy during the debates in the General Assembly, Genocide Convention, and Apartheid Convention on the topic of establishing an international criminal court. Chapter six considers the post-Cold War era and includes discussions in the United States to establish an international criminal tribunal for Iraq, as well as the United States's role in establishing the international criminal tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda and the special courts for Sierra Leone and Lebanon. Furthermore, this study devotes two chapters to the relationship between the United States and the International Criminal Court. Chapter seven analyzes the period immediately following the Cold War from 1989 through the Rome Conference in 1998. Chapter eight analyzes the United States's position on the International Criminal Court during the period following the Rome Conference to the present time, including the last two years of William Clinton¿s presidency, the eight years of George W. Bush's presidency, and the first term of Barack Obama¿s presidency. en_US
dc.subject International criminal tribunals en_US
dc.subject United States diplomacy en_US
dc.subject War crimes en_US
dc.subject Irish Centre for Human Rights en_US
dc.subject Law en_US
dc.title The United States and International Criminal Tribunals en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.local.note International criminal tribunals are established to prosecute individuals accused of committing the worse crimes of international concern, including genocide and crimes against humanity. This study examines the policies put forth by the United States during international debates that established international criminal tribunals from the pre-First World War era to 2012. en_US
dc.local.final Yes en_US

Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record