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The effects of shared opinions on nonverbal mimicry

ARAN - Access to Research at NUI Galway

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dc.contributor.author Drury, Meghann en
dc.date.accessioned 2010-11-19T12:14:27Z en
dc.date.available 2010-11-19T12:14:27Z en
dc.date.issued 2006-06 en
dc.identifier.citation Drury, M., & Van Swal, L. M. (2006). The effects of shared opinions on nonverbal mimicry. Paper presented at the International Communication Association Annual Conference. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10379/1425 en
dc.description.abstract People often mimic each other. Research has examined the positive social benefits of mimicry and is starting to examine what factors lead to increased mimicry. Two studies examine whether a participant is more likely to mimic nonverbal behavior of someone who shares the same opinion as the participant than someone who does not. The participant made a decision between 2 vacation destinations and discussed the choice in a 3 person group. The 2 other group members were confederates. One agreed with the participant¿s choice and one disagreed. Each confederate emitted a different nonverbal behavior consistently throughout discussion. Results support the hypothesis that the participant would be more likely to mimic nonverbal behavior of the confederate who agreed with him or her. en
dc.format application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Nonverbal imitation en
dc.subject Chameleon effect en
dc.subject Mimicry en
dc.subject Mirroring en
dc.subject Enterprise Agility en
dc.title The effects of shared opinions on nonverbal mimicry en
dc.type Conference Paper en
dc.description.peer-reviewed peer-reviewed en

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